Infertility, Miscarriage & Premature Birth

Lower Sperm Counts Linked To A Diet High In Saturated Fat

Research has suggested that a diet high in saturated fat may be responsible for lower concentrations of sperm. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition examined the association between dietary fat intake and semen quality among 701 young Danish men from the general population from 2008 to 2010. Read more here...

Eating fruits and vegetables cuts risk of miscarriage, says study

The study of nearly 7,000 pregnant women by researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine looked for links between diet, lifestyle and miscarriage, and were detailed in the study led by Dr. Maureen Maconochie from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Read more here...

The Premature Birth Problem

Last year, one in every eight babies in the United States was born prematurely—a 30 percent increase over 1981 rates, according to a report released Thursday by the National Academy of Science’s Institute of Medicine. The study notes that babies born prematurely are at greater risk for health problems ranging from cerebral palsy and mental retardation to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and crossed eyes. Read more here...

Trans Fats Double Infertility Risk

Cutting trans fats from the diet may be especially important for women of childbearing age who want to have children. Eating these unhealthy fats has been strongly linked to an increased risk for heart disease. Now, new research suggests they also increase a woman's risk of infertility. In their study, nutrition researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health found that women with ovulation-related fertility problems tended to eat more trans fats than fertile women. Read more here... and here... and here...

Study Suggests Link Between Diet Sodas, Preterm Delivery

Could drinking one or more artificially sweetened, carbonated diet sodas a day boost a woman's odds of premature delivery? A study from Denmark suggests such a link. The researchers looked at the soft drink habits of nearly 60,000 Danish women enrolled in a national study there from 1996 to 2002. Read more here...

Study: Hidden Trans Fats Boost Women's Infertility Risk by 70 Percent

Already known to increase the risk of heart disease, trans fats may also increase a woman's risk of fertility problems by 70 percent or more, according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Read more here...

Premature Birth

To help reduce your chances of delivering your baby prematurely, take the following steps; Get the proper prenatal care throughout your entire pregnancy. Eat a healthy, balanced diet with plenty of vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients. Read more here...

Poorly nourished mothers may be prone to premature deliveries

Babies conceived by undernourished mothers may be at high risk of premature birth, according to a study of ewes and their lambs. The study found that restricting the diet of ewes for 60 days before they mated and for 30 days afterward resulted in lambs being born days earlier than the offspring of well nourished ewes. Read more here...

Immunological Factors & Infertility

The immune system provides us with a multilayer defense against invading microbes and foreign intruders. It can recognize the difference between normal (self) and alien (non-self) cells, trigger a local or widespread inflammatory response, and retain the memory of the offending organism to repel it again if it should ever return. Like any finely-tuned machine, however, the system can break down and leave us open to the threat of infection, or, conversely, turn against our own healthy tissues. Read more here...

Antioxidants tied to lower risk of preterm birth

Pregnant women who eat plenty of red- and orange-hued fruits and vegetables may have lower odds of giving birth prematurely, a new study suggests. Researchers found that among more than 5,300 women who gave birth at one of four Canadian hospitals, those with higher blood levels of certain carotenoids were less likely to deliver preterm. Read more here...

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